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Weigh correctly

Weigh correctly – a guide to obtaining accurate results and improving weighing methods.
The guide “Weigh correctly” sets out our recommendations for improving the accuracy of weighing results and eliminating errors when working with laboratory scales.
The guide “Weigh correctly” sets out our recommendations for improving the accuracy of weighing results and eliminating errors when working with laboratory scales.
Factors affecting the accuracy of weighing may adversely affect the results of the entire analysis. Therefore, it is important to know the rules for working with laboratory scales.

Weighing is one of the most frequent, important and time-consuming operations performed in the laboratory. It is therefore extremely important to weigh correctly.

The design of modern scales allows in most cases to do without a special room for weighing, which may be necessary only for working with ultramicro-weights.

The latest developments in the field of electronics significantly simplified work with scales and reduced weighing time. The digital touchscreen display makes control of the device intuitive.

However, external ease of use can result in a careless attitude to numerous factors that may affect the accuracy of weighing, and consequently, the results of the analysis. By external factors we mean physical impact, measured for laboratory scales of all types. External factors include:

Electrostatic forces

Some manifestations of the properties of samples are also mistaken for external influences – for example, evaporation of liquids or loss and weight gain due to the hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties of solid materials.

This manual describes the most common factors affecting the accuracy of weighing, and explains the basic principles of proper weighing on laboratory scales. The guide begins with the guidelines for locating weights. Then outlines the procedure for the operation of this sensitive device and analyzes the possible consequences of external influences. Most of these effects manifest themselves in a slow change in weight readings (the so-called drift).